The Top 5 books you have read in the past two years!

Today’s list will feature the best books you have read in the past two years! Maybe you really love Vampire novels or the saga of Katniss Everdeen, or perhaps you like non-fiction books. Either way, create a top 5 and get it out there! This is also a good way to get summer book ideas as well as share ideas with other people. This doesn’t have to be about books that came out in the past two years, just ones that you happened to read in the past two years.

Today’s guest lister is Bryce Scherer-Brian.  Bryce is a graduate from UW-Oshkosh and moved out to LA with her now husband Patrick. Bryce keeps busy by reading, so she is perfect for this list. Bryce also maintains (with three other friends of mine) a blog which you can find here: http://onceamonth4ladies.com/

Here is Bryce’s list for favorite books she read in the past two years:

1)      Bossypants – Tina Fey is an idol of mine. It’s funny and smart and a really quick read.

Bossypants

2)      World War Z – Very cool idea for a book.

World War Z

3)      The Devil in the White City – I like learning about serial killers and history. You get both in this one!

The Devil in the White City

4)     The Big Short – It blew my mind to learn about the financial crisis.

The Big Short

5)      Catching Fire – The best of the trilogy, in my opinion. I heart Katniss.

Catching Fire

Here is my list for top 5 books I have read in the past 2 years:

1)      Song of Fire and Ice – I am going to just lump all 5 books currently out into one, otherwise my list might be just these books. They have been discussed on other lists already for good reason. They are super dense, but if you love a world rich in detail and filled with “real” people, then you will love these.

Dances with Dragons: Book 5

2)      Moneyball – I was a little late to this party, but the book was phenomenal. If you consider yourself a “nerd” or a “geek”, this is the book for you. It takes the game of baseball and completely redefines the game using numbers and math to objectify players instead of using our eyes. I think it is really cool when nerdiness can change a culture of thinking, and that is exactly what this book shows. This is also the second Michael Lewis book on this list. (Bryce chose The Big Short on her top 5.)

Moneyball

3)      Generation Kill – I read this probably just about two years ago, but I am including it. If you haven’t had the pleasure of reading it, please do. It follows the kids (KIDS!) that form up the first recon division of the Marine Corps as they become some of the first troops into Iraq during the War. How do kids deal with killing and death? They make jokes, play games and basically do anything they can to forget where they are. However, sometimes nothing can make you forget…

Generation Kill

4)      Hunger Games – I agree with Bryce that I really believe Catching Fire is the best out of the series, and I will include it in this. I would, however, ask that whoever decides to read this series omit the third book. It takes all the grittiness, desperation and brutality from the story and it really falls flat.

The Hunger Games

5)      Eye of the World – This is the first book in the Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan. I am not sure what is going to happen (since I have only read this one and there seem to be around 12 books out in this saga) but I love the characters of Lan and Morianne.

Eye of the World

Now it is your turn! What are the top 5 books you have read in the past 2 years?

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5 Comments

  1. Paul

     /  July 4, 2012

    1. 1984 by George Orwell- It’s a damn shame it took me until 25 to read it. Probably the best book I’ve ever read.
    2. Catch 22 by Joseph Heller- Quite entertaining war novel about, well, a catch 22. A man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes a formal request to be removed from duty, he is proven sane and therefore ineligible to be removed. It’s deep, graphic, and hysterical.
    3. Life of Pi by Yann Martel- I am not a religious person by any means, but I found this book interesting. A God loving boy gets stuck on a life raft with a hyena, orangutan, zebra, and a Bengel tiger. Supposedly it is a real story, but who knows.
    4. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot- I often times get my reading materials from lists, ironically. The Waste Land is considered one of the most important poems of the 20th century, so I gave it a shot. It was pretty good too. Difficult at times to read, so I read it twice to get the full feel.
    5. Decision Points by George W. Bush- This book may have actually been written by GW. The chapters were 10 pages, it was the easiest read ever, and at times it was quite comical, but this book put a soft spot in my heart for G dubb.

    Reply
  2. Stu

     /  July 4, 2012

    Look at you paul, nailing out some classic fiction works. You may have inspired me.

    My list of top 5 books in the last two years is also the complete list of books I have read over the last 2 years, I wish I read more but have trouble getting into books.

    1. Ice and Fire GRRM
    2. Combination of all published Sherlock Holmes novels/short stories Arthur Conan Doyle
    3. The Lost world Arthur Conan Doyle
    4. The Time Machine HG Wells – Haven’t finished this yet but have thoroughly enjoyed thus far.
    5. The Hunger Games – This only made the top 5 as I couldn’t think of a single other book I read beginning to end. I didn’t enjoy the book. Probably would have liked it more if it wasn’t read immediately after finishing Ice and Fire.

    Reply
  3. Adam K

     /  July 6, 2012

    Awesome idea, Jeff – I’m excited to join the fun.

    Paul’s list is particularly impressive considering the reading load of law school, which I

    1) House of Cards by William Cohen – like the guest lister, the roots of the financial crisis blew my mind. This book is about the collapse of Bear Sterns in March of 2008, which eventually led to the run on Wall Street that occurred later that year.

    2) White House Burning by Simon Johnson – as close as it gets to straight-talk on the national debt. I have followed Simon Johnson over at The Baseline Scenario for some time and he definitely leans left, but this book (or at least the first few chapters) is a must read for anyone interested in an historical perspective to the problem.

    3) The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff – how better to teach the principles of Taoism than through Winnie the Pooh? I read this book during my first year of college, and am currently reading it for the third time.

    4) Atlas Shrugged by Aryn Rand – after much persuasion, I have finally picked up a copy. Surprisingly, I am really into it…

    5) Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – it’s a classic. I enjoyed it, but it’s really on the list because I didn’t want to admit that I read The Hunger Games trilogy (I second Jeff’s comments – found myself skimming the third book).

    Reply
  4. Adam K

     /  July 6, 2012

    Awesome idea, Jeff – I’m excited to join the fun.

    Paul’s list is particularly impressive considering the reading load of law school.

    1) House of Cards by William Cohen – like the guest lister, the roots of the financial crisis blew my mind. This book is about the collapse of Bear Sterns in March of 2008, which eventually led to the run on Wall Street that occurred later that year.

    2) White House Burning by Simon Johnson – as close as it gets to straight-talk on the national debt. I have followed Simon Johnson over at The Baseline Scenario for some time and he definitely leans left, but this book (or at least the first few chapters) is a must read for anyone interested in an historical perspective to the problem.

    3) The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff – how better to teach the principles of Taoism than through Winnie the Pooh? I read this book during my first year of college, and am currently reading it for the third time.

    4) Atlas Shrugged by Aryn Rand – after much persuasion, I have finally picked up a copy. Surprisingly, I am really into it…

    5) Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – it’s a classic. I enjoyed it, but it’s really on the list because I didn’t want to admit that I read The Hunger Games trilogy (I second Jeff’s comments – found myself skimming the third book).

    Reply
  5. There seem to be a lot of books dealing with Economy on these lists. Bryce has The Big Short, Adam has House of Cards, and I would even submit my personal list has one: Moneyball. Maybe not our national economy, but an economic system that is/was broken all the same.

    Reply

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